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Protect your pets from wolf attacks in Minnesota

You Have The Right To Protect - According To State Law

EDITED: Recently, we have received an alarming influx of reports and emails regarding dangerous incidents where wolves have targeted pets and livestock. Thankfully, we have not received any reports of humans being attacked. However, it is crucial for all our followers to be aware of their rights to protect themselves. We strongly urge you to exercise these rights and keep your loved ones safe. Our data suggests that these attacks are on the rise, making vigilance more important than ever.

NOW FEDERALLY PROTECTED - OBVIOUSLY STATE LAW CAN NOT SUPERSEDE FEDERAL LAW

Minnesota Statutes

Destroying wolves in defense of human life.

A person may, at any time and without a permit, take a wolf in defense of the person's own life or the life of another. A person who destroys a wolf under this subdivision must protect all evidence and report the taking to a conservation officer as soon as practicable but no later than 48 hours after the wolf is destroyed.

Destroying wolves threatening livestock, guard animals, or domestic animals.

An owner of livestock, guard animals, or domestic animals, and the owner's agents may, at any time and without a permit, shoot or destroy a wolf when the wolf is posing an immediate threat to livestock, a guard animal, or a domestic animal located on property owned, leased, or occupied by the owner of the livestock, guard animal, or domestic animal. A person who destroys a wolf under this subdivision must protect all evidence and report the taking to a conservation officer as soon as practicable but no later than 48 hours after the wolf is destroyed.

Destroying wolves threatening domestic pets.

An owner of a domestic pet may, at any time and without a permit, shoot or destroy a wolf when the wolf is posing an immediate threat to a domestic pet under the supervision of the owner. A person who destroys a wolf under this subdivision must protect all evidence and report the taking to a conservation officer as soon as practicable but no later than 48 hours after the wolf is destroyed.

(2) Prohibitions. The following prohibitions apply to the gray wolf in Minnesota.

(i) Taking. Except as provided in this paragraph (d)(2)(i) of this section, no person may take a gray wolf in Minnesota.

(A) Any person may take a gray wolf in Minnesota in defense of his own life or the lives of others.

(B) Any employee or agent of the Service, any other Federal land management agency, or the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, who is designated by his/her agency for such purposes, may, when acting in the course of his or her official duties, take a gray wolf in Minnesota without a permit if such action is necessary to:

( 1) Aid a sick, injured, or orphaned specimen; or

( 2) Dispose of a dead specimen; or

( 3) Salvage a dead specimen which may be useful for scientific study.

(C) Designated employees or agents of the Service or the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources may take a gray wolf without a permit in Minnesota, in zones 2, 3, 4, and 5, as delineated in paragraph (d)(l) of this section, in response to depredations by a gray wolf on lawfully present domestic animals: Provided, that such taking must occur within one-half mile of the place where such depredation occurred and must be performed in a humane manner: And provided further, that any young of the year taken on or before August 1 of that year must be released.

(D) Any taking pursuant to paragraph (d)(2)(i)(A), (d)(2)(i)(B), or (d)(2)(i)(C) of this section must be reported by email to the Twin Cities Ecological Service Field Office at within 5 days. The specimen may only be retained, disposed of, or salvaged in accordance with directions from the Service.

(E) Any employee or agent of the Service or the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, when operating under a Cooperative Agreement with the Service signed in accordance with section 6(c) of the Endangered Species Act of 1973, who is designated by the Service or the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources for such purposes, may, when acting in the course of his or her official duties, take a gray wolf in Minnesota to carry out scientific research or conservation programs.

(ii) Export and commercial transactions. Except as may be authorized by a permit issued under § 17.32, no person may sell or offer for sale in interstate commerce, import or export, or in the course of a commercial activity transport, ship, carry, deliver, or receive any Minnesota gray wolf.

(iii) Unlawfully taken wolves. No person may possess, sell, deliver, carry, transport, or ship, by any means whatsoever, a gray wolf taken unlawfully in Minnesota, except that an employee or agent of the Service, or any other Federal land management agency, or the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, who is designated by his/her agency for such purposes, may, when acting in the course of his official duties, possess, deliver, carry, transport, or ship a gray wolf taken unlawfully in Minnesota.

 
(3) Permits. All permits available under § 17.32 (General Permits—Threatened Wildlife) are available with regard to the gray wolf in Minnesota. All the terms and provisions of § 17.32 apply to such permits issued under the authority of this paragraph (d)(3).

 

 

Please follow the law. Federal and State. https://www.revisor.mn.gov/statutes/2022/cite/97B.645

https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/wolves/index.html#:~:text=Effective%20Feb.,in%20defense%20of%20human%20life.

https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2023/11/03/2023-24299/endangered-and-threatened-wildlife-and-plants-reinstatement-of-endangered-species-act-protections 

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